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Built in "error handling"

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 10, 2010    Points: 0   Category :SharePoint
We use a SharePoint text field to hold user-entered phone numbers. Occassionaly we find an invalid number such as  (111)23A-5678. Out of the box, does SharePoint offer any way to catch such errors and inform the user to re-enter the data?  (Who likes to have bad data in their system? NOt I for one.) TIA, Barkingdog    

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