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InvaliddCastException thrown when the UI contains cross-appdomain components?

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 09, 2010    Points: 0   Category :.NET Framework
Hi, All My application contains some UI elements from other AppDomain and wrapped by ystem.AddIn.Pipeline.FrameworkElementAdapters. It works well most time, but sometimes I may get an InvalidCastException: [A]System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation can't be cast to [B]System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation. It seems the two types have same name and from the same assembly : C:\Windows\Microsoft.Net\assembly\GAC_MSIL\WindowsBase\v4.0_4.0.0.0_31bf3856ad364e35\WindowsBase.dll   Do you know how to fix the exception? Thanks

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