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Don't Get Me Started: Edge Cases

Posted By:      Posted Date: August 21, 2010    Points: 0   Category :ASP.Net
 

Developers should focus their time and effort on the 99 normal use cases, rather than the one unusual use case that often gets way too much attention.

David Platt

MSDN Magazine March 2010




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