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Access functions within a JNI from within C#

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 07, 2010    Points: 0   Category :.NET Framework
 
I need some advice on the best way to approach this task: I have a vendor-supplied JNI DLL that designed to be used by a Java program. This JNI SDK contains functions I need access to via an application in C#. I do not need to access any java components that call this JNI, I only need to get to the API the JNI provides, so I don't need to bridge back into the java. I have the entry points and definitions of how a Java program would access these functions, but need to figure out how to get to them from C#. I've been trying create an interop wrapper class to be called from C#, but it's providing a challenge with how parameters are passed, and frankly, I'm not that good. What would be the best/easiest way to hook into this dll?  To be more specific, here's what I'm trying to do: This is what I know about the Java side of the application and how it calls the DLL: class MYJNI { MYJNI() { } public static final native void MyApplication_init(); public static final native long new_MyApplication__SWIG_0(String s, String s1, String s2); //many more functions defined here... } public final class MyApplication { protected MyApplication(long l, boolean flag) { swigCMemOwn = flag; swigCPtr = l; } public static void init() { MYJNI.MyApplication_init(); } public MyApplication(String s, String s1, String s2) { this(MYJNI.new_MyApplication__S


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