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How to manage Response from servlet in C#

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 06, 2010    Points: 0   Category :.NET Framework
Good day everyone.   Im not that experienced with c# yet, and im having trouble in getting the correct information from a servlet response.   In my code i make a request usign code like this: HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("https://<ServerIP>/downloadCfdWebView? serie=[serie]&folio=[folio]&tipo=[XML o PDF]&rfc=[rfc]&key=[key]"); // Execute the request HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse(); In my servlet if the parameters are ok a XML or PDF file is retrieved when using the call in a browser, but if the file that i requested doesn't exist just trhow a message in the internet browser, "File doesn`t exist". IF i make a call through c# to that servlet, with wich method can i validate that response? the methods showed by the HttpWebResponse doesn't seems to help to get that validation, and i want to know when the file didn't exist . Maybe i need another form of call to the servlet. Can anyone help me with some guidance, tip or trick? Any help would be greatly appreciated!   TIA! Zenrigar =)<br/>  

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