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Transfer SQL Server Objects reporting success but nothing transferred

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 02, 2010    Points: 0   Category :Sql Server
I'm trying to "clone" the structure of one database to a new blank database. I can copy the tables over using the Transfer Sql server object without any problems. When I create a separate task "Transfer Sql server object" for the views (CopyAllViews set to true or picking individual views), it always reports success however none of the views were copied. The same problem occurs when I attempt to copy stored procedures. Anyone have an idea of what's going wrong?  

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Transfer SQL Server Objects Task

I'm trying to use the Transfer SQL Server Objects Task to copy database users and database roles from one database to another. The problem is that some of the users already exists in the destination database. Is there a setting or expression or error handler that will allow me to specify to only copy the objects that don't already exist? I can ignore the failure but I won't know if it's really a copy failure or a duplicate. I read the roll-your-own blog referenced in a similar post (http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mattm/archive/2007/04/18/roll-your-own-transfer-sql-server-objects-task.aspx) but I don't know if a property exists for the transfer object with will allow me to indicate that I want to copy users that aren't already in the destination. Has anyone successfully done this? It seems like it would be a simple task.

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I created an SSIS package which contains a Transfer SQL Server Objects Task. I configured this task to copy table objects, stored procedures, and object permissions to the destination. Between the time I created my SSIS package and the time it was run, someone created a new table object in the source, and changed permissions on a stored proc in the source. My question is this, at the time the SSIS package is created, behind the scenes, does SSIS create a list of objects to transfer? I had hoped that it creates the list of what specific objects (of the pre-defined type) to transfer at runtime so that whatever changes were made to the source database would be included at runtime.

Is there any way to get the Transfer SQL Server Objects Task to not throw error if an object already


I've asked this before but never got an answer. Is there a way to configure the Transfer SQL Server Objects Task so that it will only transfer objects that don't already exist in the destination? Or to skip over objects that already exist?

I do not want to "roll my own". I want to use the task in order to save time.

Why does BI "Transfer SQL Server Objects Task" error occur?


I'm using SSIS to copy all tables and the data from server1 to server2.  Database names are same on both source and destination servers. dbo.MyTable definately exists in the source so I don't understand this error message:

 [Transfer SQL Server Objects Task] Error: Execution failed with the following error: "ERROR : errorCode=-1071636471 description=SSIS Error Code DTS_E_OLEDBERROR.  An OLE DB error has occurred. Error code: 0x80040E37. An OLE DB record is available.  Source: "Microsoft SQL Server Native Client 10.0"  Hresult: 0x80040E37  Description: "Invalid object name 'dbo.MyTable'.".  helpFile=dtsmsg100.rll helpContext=0 idofInterfaceWithError={C81DFC5A-3B22-4DA3-BD3B-10BF861A7F9C}".

 There's nothing fancy about MyTable:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[MyTable](

[MyId] [

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i've seen several links when searching for this problem but nothing definitely solves this...or if it does it seems to be among people who seem to know scripting really well and can figure stuff out. my problem is as follows.

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