.NET Tutorials, Forums, Interview Questions And Answers
Welcome :Guest
Sign In
Win Surprise Gifts!!!

Top 5 Contributors of the Month
david stephan
Gaurav Pal
Post New Web Links

Extend WebScriptServiceHostFactory

Posted By:      Posted Date: September 02, 2010    Points: 0   Category :WCF
Hi all, i want to extend the the WebScriptServiceHostFactory class to implement a security feature, has anyone does this before ??. this is what i want to do 1) get hold of the default endpoint the WebScriptServiceHostFactory  generates  2)  and override the behaviorConfiguration it generates with my own   your help is appreicated.   thanks Nen

View Complete Post

More Related Resource Links

CLR Inside Out: Extend Windows Forms Apps Using System.AddIn


See how Windows Forms applications can be adapted to use the new .NET Add-in framework (System.AddIn) this month.

Mueez Siddiqui

MSDN Magazine July 2008

Cmdlets: Extend Windows PowerShell With Custom Commands


Jim Truher presents an introduction to writing and registering your own custom cmdlets to be used in Windows PowerShell.

Jim Truher

MSDN Magazine December 2007

IIS 7.0: Extend Your WCF Services Beyond HTTP With WAS


Learn about a new IIS feature called the Windows Process Activation Service (WAS) that makes it possible to host Web services beyond HTTP.

Dominick Baier, Christian Weyer, and Steve Maine

MSDN Magazine September 2007

Office Apps: Extend Your VBA Code With VSTO


VSTO brings you the full feature set of Visual Studio including LINQ, WPF, WCF, and the .NET Framework 3.5.

Paul Stubbs and Kathleen McGrath

MSDN Magazine August 2007

RibbonX API: Extend The 2007 Office System With Your Own Ribbon Tabs And Controls


If you want to create your own professional looking tabs and controls in Office, check out the RibbonX API of the 2007 Microsoft Office system.

Eric Faller

MSDN Magazine February 2007

Worldly Windows: Extend The Global Reach Of Your Applications With Unicode 5.0


When using global applications, people want to communicate with others on their terms, in their own languages. Unicode 5.0 brings that ideal closer to reality.

Julie D. Allen, Michael S. Kaplan, Cathy Wissink

MSDN Magazine January 2007

Windows Workflow: Build Custom Activities To Extend The Reach Of Your Workflows


This article covers the core components required for building custom activities in Windows Workflow Foundation.

Matt Milner

MSDN Magazine December 2006

Extend ASP.NET: Simplify Data Binding In ASP.NET 2.0 With Our Custom Control


The wwDataBinder control addresses simple control data binding--binding simple form controls like textboxes, checkboxes, and the selected values of list controls to individual data or object values.

Rick Strahl

MSDN Magazine December 2006

Agile Development: Extend Team Foundation Server To Enable Continuous Integration


How does Visual Studio 2005 Team System and Team Foundation Server facilitate the process of agile development and continuous integration? Here Ben Waldron explains it all.

Ben Waldron

MSDN Magazine March 2006

Custom Cultures: Extend Your Code's Global Reach With New Features In The .NET Framework 2.0


The upcoming Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 adds a number of globalization features that address the important issues of extensibility, standards support, and migration. Here authors Michael Kaplan and Cathy Wissink explain what these features mean to your globalization effort.

Michael Kaplan and Cathy Wissink

MSDN Magazine October 2005

Types in Yukon: Managed UDTs Let You Extend the SQL Server Type System


The next version of SQL Server, code-named "Yukon," will offer enhanced support for user-defined types (UDTs). Because UDTs can be managed by the CLR, you can represent a wide variety of data structures to create types not possible with previous versions of SQL Server. With UDTs you can more precisely control the kind of data your type accepts, resulting in better data management. This article explores UDTs in "Yukon" and covers their design and implementation.

Peter W. DeBetta

MSDN Magazine February 2004

Web Services: Extend the ASP.NET WebMethod Framework with Business Rules Validation


In an earlier article the authors showed how to build a custom WebMethods extension that provides XML Schema validation, a function that is lacking in ASP.NET. In the process they established a foundation for enforcing business rules during the deserialization of XML data. The technique, which is described in this article, uses declarative XPath assertions to test business rule compliance.In building this business rules validation engine, the authors integrate the validation descriptions into the WSDL file that is automatically generated by the WebMethod infrastructure. Finally, they demonstrate how to extend wsdl.exe, the tool that generates WebMethod proxy/server code from WSDL files, to make use of their extensions.

Aaron Skonnard and Dan Sullivan

MSDN Magazine August 2003

Web Services: Extend the ASP.NET WebMethod Framework by Adding XML Schema Validation


WebMethods make the development of XML Web Services easier by encapsulating a good deal of functionality, but there is still a lot of underlying XML processing that you have to be responsible for. For example, WebMethods do not validate messages against the implied schema. Because they are not validated, the response that's returned can result in unintended consequences. To address this, the authors extend the WebMethod framework by adding XML Schema validation through a custom SoapExtension class.

Aaron Skonnard and Dan Sullivan

MSDN Magazine July 2003

COM+: Create a Compensating Resource Manager to Extend Your App's Transactional Features


A Compensating Resource Manager (CRM) is any COM+ object that uses the CRM facility provided by COM+, a set of tools that make it simple to create a custom resource manager for business scenarios that require handling some non-database operation (such as generating a file) as part of a transaction. This article provides an overview of transaction processing, distributed transactions, and the two-phase commit protocol for transactions. Also covered are the implementation and configuration of a CRM.

Alan Gordon

MSDN Magazine March 2001

Windows 2000 Registry: Latest Features and APIs Provide the Power to Customize and Extend Your Apps


The Windows registry as it is recognized today first appeared in Windows 95. Its introduction simplified the storage of initialization information and made that data more secure. This article covers the history of the registry, the form it took in the early days, and its current incarnation in Windows 2000. Practical tips for managing data in the registry are outlined, along with descriptions of special keys, functions, and file types. Manipulation of the registry to customize both application behavior and certain features in Windows is discussed. Also covered are future directions of the registry, including the use of XML to store registry information in a hierarchical fashion.

Dino Esposito

MSDN Magazine November 2000

ASP.NetWindows Application  .NET Framework  C#  VB.Net  ADO.Net  
Sql Server  SharePoint  Silverlight  Others  All   

Hall of Fame    Twitter   Terms of Service    Privacy Policy    Contact Us    Archives   Tell A Friend